Past Courses

Course Offerings

1999-2000

2000-2001

2001-2002

2002-2003

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011 (N/A)

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

 

Winter 2016

 

Asian Am 203/SOC 276

Topics in Social and Cultural Analysis: Second Generation Asian American Experience

Jennifer Huynh

MW 2:00-3:20 p.m.

Children of immigrants comprise one-in-five of Americans under age 18, and the proportion is growing rapidly. This course focuses on how the children of immigrants, or rising second generation, experience growing up American. Using a sociological lens, we will explore family and school life, intergenerational relations, identity, religion, and how youth and society frame "success". It focuses on the unique aspects of being second-generation Asian American.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

Asian Am 218/Af Am 214

Asian-Black Historical Relations in the U.S.

Nitasha Sharma

MW 11:00 a.m.-12:20 p.m.

Why do Asian Americans and African Americans seem to be incommensurably different groups? How can we understand the tensions between these communities? And where can we find evidence of past solidarity and commonality? This course offers an interdisciplinary examination of the experiences of Asian and Black peoples in the U.S. Topics include: racialization and sexualization of Blacks and Asians; slavery and early immigration legislation; international “Afro-Asian” connections; racial and economic dynamics in the post-WWII economy; deindustrialization; social movements of the 1960s and 1970s; and theories of inter-minority relations beyond Black and White.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

Historical Studies Distro

 

Asian Am 216/History 216

Global Asians

Ji-Yeon Yuh

TuTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.

This is a comparative course that will examine the international migration histories of different Asian groups in the 20th century as well as the development of community and identity of those groups in national contexts. In short, we will explore the borders, cultural encounters, and mixings of Asian groups in various socioeconomic and political contexts in different nation-states. We will interrogate the concept of diaspora versus migration versus immigration; we will examine the immigration policies of host countries in Europe, the Americas, and Asia, and the settlement histories of Asians within these countries.

Historical Studies Distro

 

Asian Am 247

Asian Americans & Pop Culture

Laura Fugikawa

MW 12:30-1:50 p.m.

What is Asian American Popular Culture? This course will look at food, popular film, music, television, YouTube, consumer culture and print culture (zines, graphic novels and art). We will go beyond looking at tropes of the Other, the "model minority" and the mainstream's erasure of Asian American culture to explore how Asian Americans use popular culture to challenge and critique identity categories, imagine solidarities and motivate change. 

Literature and Fine Arts Distro

 

Asian Am 303

Settler Colonialism / Indigeneity

Laura Fugikawa

MW 3:30-4:50 p.m.

This course looks at colonialism as continuing structural power rather than an historical event. With a focus on the Asia, the Pacific Islands and the Americas, this course examines and questions settler, indigenous and arrivant identities. What cultural, economic and political work does settler colonialism do to justify imperialism? What does settler colonialism look like in contemporary culture? How have Indigenous peoples challenged settler colonialism through political action and art? What alternative world-views push back against policies of coloniality and the rhetoric of modernity?  This course will engage with current discussions in Asian American Studies, Native American/Indigenous Studies and Ethnic Studies.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

Asian Am 360/Gndr St 341/Asian St 390

Medical Tourism & Transnational Sexuality

Jillana Enteen

TuTh 12:30-1:50 p.m.

This course is situated at the intersection of theoretical, cultural, and medical, and commercial online discourses concerning the burgeoning Sexual Reassignment Surgery (SRS) medical surgeries presented online and practiced in Thailand. Using “Trans” theories: transgender, transnational, translation, spatio/temporal, we will discuss the intersections, dialogues, refusals and adoptions when thinking about medical tourism to Thailand. We will examine Thai cultural/historical conceptions of sex and genders, debates concerning bodies and diagnosis that took place during the drafting of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V), and changes in presentations of sex/gender related surgeries offered online.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

Asian Am 394

Asian Identity in Cinema

Tatsu Aoki

Tu 6:00-8:00 p.m.

This course is a survey and discussion-based course examining representations of Asian and Asian American icons in the U.S. We will do this by comparing portrayals of Asians in films made by Asians versus those produced by the American mainstream. Course materials include Hollywood films, mainstream Asian films, independent works and other visual media such as Youtube videos.

 

 

Fall 2015

 

Asian Am 210/Amer St 310-22

Introduction to Asian American Studies

Laura Fugikawa

MW 2:00-3:20 p.m.

Ethnic studies programs are the result of dissatisfaction with the absence of the histories, stories and experiences of people of color in the academy. As the result of this social movement, Asian American Studies emerged in the 1960s to incorporate Asian American histories and experiences into the classroom. We will discuss a broad historical and regional grounding of experiences of Asian Americans in the 19th and 20th centuries; focus on issues of representation in literature, films, and pop culture, and identity organizations that meet these needs in Asian American Chicago.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

Asian Am 225/Sociology 276

Contemporary Issues in Asian American Communities: Ethnic Economies & Neighborhoods

Jennifer Huynh

TuTH 3:30-4:50 p.m.

This course studies immigrant entrepreneurship, the formation, function, and persistence of ethnic neighborhoods and economies on identity, family, immigrant integration, and gender. Case studies examining historical enclaves such as Chicago's Chinatown and Los Angeles' Koreatown, the rise of affluent ethnoburbs in California, and ethnic niches and economies in new immigrant destinations will be discussed.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

Asian Am 335/Anthro 335

Language in Asian America

Shalini Shankar

TuTh 11:00-12:20 p.m.

This course will examine language use among Asian communities in the U.S. We will explore topics of language socialization, bilingualism, code-switching, language retention and loss, stereotypes, English as a Second Language, and slang in conjunction with broader dynamics of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality will be explored. Special attention will be paid to processes of racial and ethnic formation through language ideologies and use, especially in the context of English monolingualism, the model minority stereotype, and the white public sphere.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

Asian Am 360/Gender St 382

Studies in Race, Gender and Sexuality

Laura Fugikawa

MW11:00-12:20 p.m.

This course is a cross-disciplinary examination of issues related to genders and sexualities among Asian Americans, with critical attention paid to experiences across various social and political contexts. This class will discuss queer and LGBT issues, ethno-sexualization, interracial relationships, masculinities, and femininities, and representation in pop culture. We will engage with historical contexts, critical theories of race and gender and sexuality frameworks, and sociology studies, as well as interrogate a range of Asian American narratives regarding genders and sexualities.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

 

2014-2015

Spring 2015

 

Asian Am 203/ Sociology 276

2nd Generation Asian American Experience

Carolyn Chen

This course offers a critical sociological examination of what it means to be a 1.5 and second-generation Asian American through scholarly works, memoirs, blogs and popular journalism. How does the second generation Asian American experience compare to other racial groups? How is the second-generation becoming American? We will explore these questions through second-generation Asian American experiences of race and ethnicity, religion, family, education, dating and sexuality, and mental health.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

Asian Am 380/Theatre 365

Performing Asian America

Elizabeth Son

This course examines the Asian American experience through embodies practices of theatre, performance art, spoken word, and social performances. We will discuss the intersectionalities of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class in relation to topics of im/migration, citizenship, identity and community formation, U.S. imperialism, and political activism. We will read key works in Asian American history, theatre, and performance studies, along with critical readings from gender and sexuality, (post)colonial, trauma, and cultural studies.

Literature and Fine Arts Distro

 

Asian Am 394

Asian American Arts in Practice

Tatsu Aoki

Arts in Practice is a survey and research based class structure. This course will examine the cross cultural work of Asian American artists with a focus on the regional arts and culture along with the influence of the national movement as well as internationally known artists, historical analysis of the Asian American music and visual arts. The main focus of the study will be the phenomenal development in the last 20 years as Chicago and the Bay Area (but not limited to) mark significant contribution for the new and traditional music, performing arts and visual arts. Also, many influential cyber arts and/or non arts movement such as Youtube submissions, internet based performing activities and web page presentations will be investigated. Themes that will be addressed are the forming of new cultural and artistic communities and their impact on the mainstream culture, collaboration between communities and cultures on the local and transnational levels, culture, community and economic development issues in the arts and society. In-class listening and viewing sessions and field assignments are required.

 

Asian Am 275/English 275

Intro to Asian American Literature

Jinah Kim

This course examines literature, film, and critical theory created by Asian Americans to examine the development of "Asian America" as a literary field. We will explore how Asian American literature engages themes of race, nation and empire. We will 'deconstruct' the text to understand how Asian American literature offers a parallax view into American history, culture and political-economy. The novels short stories, plays and films studied in this class chart an ongoing movement in Asian American studies from negotiating the demands for domesticated narratives of immigrant assimilation to crafting new modes of critique highlighting Asian America's transnational and postcolonial history and poesis.

Literature and Fine Arts Distro

 

 

Winter 2015

 

Asian Am/History 214

Asian American History

Ji-Yeon Yuh

This course is an introductory survey of the history of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans in the United States. We will examine the experiences of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans from a historically grounded, interdisciplinary perspective that locates these experiences within the international context of diaspora and labor migration and the domestic contect of race relations, nation-building and U.S. prominence as a world power.

Historical Studies Distro

 

Asian Am 350/Sociology 376

Asian American Religions

Carolyn Chen

Religion is one of the most significant institutions in Asiam American communities and plays a powerful force in sustaining, shaping and transforming Asian Americans. This course examines important themes in Asian American religions: immigration, community, race and ethnicity, generation and class. Students will study Asian American religious experiences through field work in local Asian American religious congregations.

Social and Behavioral Sciences, and Ethics and Values Distro

 

Asian Am 203-0-20

Asian-Black Historical Solidarities

James Daniel Elam

This class will focus on the history of solidarity between Asian Americans and African Americans in the 20th century. Both groups have faced oppression in the forms of exclusion and racism, and this class will examine the moments where political leaders attempted to forge a unity and strength from underneath these injustices. We will read novels and accounts of these moments in solidarity, and we will also examine times when unity failed.

Social and Behavioral Sciences and Historical Studies Distro

 

Asian Am 203-0-21

South Asian American Literature & Culture

James Daniel Elam

This course uses 20th-century South Asian American literature to explore how the diasporic experience can be generative and productive. By asking what we can use diaspora for, we can examine how certain experiences might enable communities understand other forms of injustice. How might South Asian American writing be "useful" for thinking about other related issues: labor activism, Afro-Asian solidarity, class precariousness, US imperilism or cosmopolitanism?

Literature and Fine Arts Distro

 

Asian Am 203-0-22

Fashion in Asian America

Linde Murugan

This course examines the politics of fashion and its ties to Asian Americans. These connections will be explored in three units: race, design and labor. We will also tackle issues of commodification, cultural appropriation and camp. Through class discussions, assignments, readings, and screenings, students will be asked to consider fashion in terms of everyday practice, aesthetics and industrial labor.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

Asian Am 203-0-23/Soc 314

Religion, Race & Ethnicity

Carolyn Chen

This course offers an introduction to the sociology of religion, focusing specifically on how religion intersects with race and ethnicity in the United States. The course will offer a comparative lens into the religious experiences of blacks, whites, Latinos, and Asians in the U.S..

 

Asian Am 392-0-21/Gndr 341

Manga and the Graphic Novel

Andrew Leong

In this seminar, students will develop their own research projects on manga, comics or graphic novels while working together through a reading list of Jewish, Japanese and American graphic narratives. We will examine metastasis not only in formal terms, but also in historical terms (psychological and physical displacements wrought by Japanese and Jewish immigration to the United States, Japanese American internment and the Holocaust.)

For Distro Request email j-linsenmeir@northwestern.edu

 

Asian Am 392-0-21/Gndr 341

Thai Medical Tourism & Sexuality

Jillana Enteen

This course is the intersection of theoretical, cultural, medical and commercial online discourses about Sexual Reassignment Surgery (SRS) presented on the World Wide Web and practiced in Thailand. Using "Trans" theories (transgender, transnational, translation and spatio/temporal), we will discuss medical tourism to Thailand. We will examine Thai cultural/historical conceptions of sex and genders, debates concerning bodies, diagnosis that took place and more.

 

Asian Am 394

Asian Identity in Cinema

Tatsu Aoki

This course looks at America's perceptions of Asians through their portrayal in American mainstream media in contrast to those made in Asia by Asian filmmakers. In doing this, the class investigates issues of representation and misrepresentation in mass culture stereotypes of Asians to show how they have been rooted in confusions surrounding cultural differences between Asian and Asian Americans.

 

 

Fall 2014

 

Asian Am 247

ASIAN AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE

Daniel Elam

This course will explore topics and issues in contemporary Asian American popular culture. We will read/watch books and films by Asian American writers and filmmakers, and we will discuss issues of representation, consumerism, and globalization.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

Asian Am 365/Anthro 365

LANGUAGE, RACE, AND ETHNICITY IN THE U.S.

Shalini Shankar

This course examines the relationship between language, race and ethnicity in the contemporary United States. It will cover major theoretical concepts about language use, race, ethnicity, and identity, and examine a number of ethnographic case studies about these issues. The course will focus primarily on language use among Asian Americans but also examine language practices by Latinos, Blacks, and Native Americans by comparison. Topics to be examined include: how languages and their speakers are regarded by institutions such as schools and workplaces; how public discourse about languages other than English affect the lives of those speakers; how language use mediate interethnic and interracial relations; why particular languages have been stigmatized while others are celebrated; the ways in which socioeconomic factors such as social class, immigration status, and educational background affect language use; and how youth use language to construct ethnic and racial identities, often in ways that cross racial boundaries. Readings will be drawn from anthropology, Asian American studies, sociolinguistics, and ethnic studies.

Literature and Fine Arts Distro

 

Asian Am 370

Studies in Diaspora: Global South Asians

Daniel Elam

This course will examine the South Asians in America before 1965. They included migrant and itinerant labor forces, political refugees and anticolonial agitators, and elite English-speaking writers and intellectuals. This course uses this full range of South Asians living in the US to give students an account of the precarious forms of political life made available to them by the uneasily intersecting rules of two empires – the emerging US, the declining British.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

 

 

2013-2014

 

Spring 2014

 

Asian Am / African Am 230

DIVERSITY AND INEQUALITY AT NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

Nitasha Sharma, Time TBA
Emerging from one of the most exciting phases of recent student activism on this campus, this brand new course offers an opportunity to investigate the power and politics of being a student at Northwestern University. By delving into deeply local events, each section analyzes the relevance of the theme to Northwestern University, to other universities and colleges, and analyzes the historical development of these issues. What is the history of our campus and how does that impact our non/belonging? Is there a shared “culture” at Northwestern University? Provocative themes include: affirmative action and admissions; theme parties; campus organizations and multiculturalism; and variations in the “student experience” at Northwestern University. Centrally, this course aims to unpack “diversity,” reveals multiple axes of inequality, and highlight how individuals occupy—and can change—institutions like this one.

Asian Am 203-0-20

THE USES OF DIASPORA IN SOUTH ASIAN AMERICAN WRITING

J. Daniel Elam, Time TBA
This course uses twentieth-century South Asian American literature to explore how the diasporic experience can be generative and productive. By asking what we can use diaspora for, we can examine how certain diasporic experiences might enable communities to understand other forms of injustice. How might South Asian American diasporic writing be “useful” for thinking about other but related issues: labor activism, Afro-Asian solidarity, class precariousness, US imperialism, or cosmopolitanism?
By asking what diaspora does (or what we can do with it) rather than what diaspora is, this course also calls into question the category of “South Asian American literature.” Given the helpful critiques that Asian American Studies has made to both American Studies and South Asian area studies, we will want to address the porousness of such categories and their frequent reliance on national boundaries. Consequently, we will read texts by, about, and for South Asian Americans – as well as their interlocutors, sympathizers, and colleagues.

Asian Am 392-0-20 / American St 301-3

RACE WARS IN AMERICAN CULTURE

Simeon Man, Time TBA
This seminar takes up “race war” as an analytical concept to approach the question of empire in U.S. history and culture. From the conquest of native peoples across the American continent to the Spanish American War, from World War II to the U.S. war in Vietnam, from the Cold War to the “war on terror”—wars have been waged not only in the name of territorial acquisition and diplomacy, but also have shaped ideas about race and nation in U.S. society. We therefore approach the study of race beyond U.S. borders, using interdisciplinary methods to interrogate its formation in transnational and imperial contexts. How have racial ideologies worked to rationalize U.S. conquest, “pacification,” and occupation overseas? In turn, how have these processes reinforced and reified racial concepts, representations, and practices in the United States? In examining these questions, we will pay attention to how historically marginalized subjects including Asian Americans, African Americans, Latinos and other racialized subjects have mobilized responses to wars, from proclaiming their loyalty and patriotism to engaging in more critical acts of protests, within and beyond the United States.

Asian Am 203-21 / History 200-40

TOPICS IN SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ANALYSIS: THE CHINESE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE

Beth Lew-Williams, Time TBA
There is no one “Chinese Americans experience.” This lecture/discussion course strives to introduce students to the multiple, varied, but overlapping experiences of people of Chinese heritage in the United States. Chinese have usually been relegated to the margins of American history, but this course will put them at the center in order to reveal how major events in American history affected the lives of Chinese Americans and how Chinese Americans played important roles in shaping those events. We will address the process of migration and settlement that brought Chinese to America and the economic, political, religious, and colonial contexts of this movement. We will also consider the racialization of Chinese in America; in other words, how other Americans came to view the Chinese race and how Chinese themselves understood their racial status in America. We will examine canonical Chinese American moments and places (like the California Gold Rush, San Francisco Chinatown, the Transcontinental Railroad) but also look for Chinese where they are unexpected (like colonial America, the 1950s South, the Civil Rights Movement). Students will engage a wide variety of primary sources, including memoirs, fiction, political cartoons, government documents, oral histories, and films.

Asian Am 360-0-20 / Gender St 382-0-21

TRANSITIONS: Medical tourism and theorizing transnational studies of sexuality

Jillana Enteen
This course is situated at the intersection of theoretical, cultural, and medical, and commercial online discourses concerning the burgeoning Sexual Reassignment Surgery (SRS) medical surgeries presented on the world wide web and practiced in Thailand. Using “Trans” theories: transgender, transnational, translation, spatio/temporal, we will discuss the intersections, dialogues, refusals and adoptions when thinking about medical tourism to Thailand. We will examine Thai cultural/historical conceptions of sex and genders, debates concerning bodies and diagnosis that took place during the drafting of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V), International SRS Standards of Care (to be drafted in BKK during the WPATH meeting in February 2014), and changes in presentations of sex/gender related surgeries offered online. Comparative cultural studies, medical discourses, and an archive of web images offering SRS surgeries to Thailand produced by Thais for western clientele will serve as axes for investigating this topic.
Assessment: Weekly project-oriented reading and writing/activities, class participation in discussions, and a final project.

Asian Am 394-0-20 / History 318

PROFESSIONAL LINKAGE PROGRAM: ASIAN IDENTITY IN CINEMA

Tatsu Aoki
This course looks at America's perceptions of Asians through their portrayal in American mainstream media in contrast to those made in Asia by Asian filmmakers. It is a survey and discussion oriented case studies of representation of Asian and Asian American icons. By comparing films made by Asians and those produced by the American mainstream, major differences in their perspectives and approaches are found. In doing this, the class investigates issues of representation and misrepresentation in mass culture stereotypes of Asians to show how they have been rooted in confusions surrounding cultural differences between Asians and Asian Americans. The course presents Hollywood films; mainstream Asian films, independent works from as well as
other visual media such as YouTube submissions and commercial application both the Asian and Asian American communities.

Asian Am 360

ASIAN AMERICAN WOMEN AND GENDER

Ji-Yeon Yuh
This seminar course explores the intersections of gender, race, and ethnicity in the experiences of Asian American women. We will examine their construction as gendered and racialized subjects, their activism as workers, mothers, and radicals, and their conceptualization of feminism. As such, the course will focus on issues of gender, sexuality, and feminism. We will discuss the development of Asian American female subjectivities and feminisms, and consider Asian American women’s relationships with mainstream white American feminism, Asian American movements, and the feminist thought of Latina and African American women.

Asian Am 392-0-21 / History 302

AMERICAN IMMIGRATION

Beth Lew-Williams
This course will examine the history immigrants in the United States. Using a comparative approach, we will consider the origins of immigration, the development of ethnic identities, and the shifts in U.S. attitudes and policies toward immigrants. Why did certain groups come to the United States? To what degree did they assimilate or retain distinct identities? How have native-born Americans view immigrants? And how has U.S. immigration law shaped immigrants’ experiences and race relations in the United States? Today, immigration continues to be an unresolved and contentious political and social issue. In this course, we will consider how past experiences, laws, and attitudes have shaped contemporary social conflicts over border security, national identity, and citizenship

Asian Am Photo Project

Inspired by Humans of New York, AASP has launched the campaign, "Asian Americans of Northwestern." The campaign explores the differences and nuances of Asian American experiences in the Northwestern community through captivating portraits of students. Interested? Click here for more info. For any questions, contact Cheryl Jue at c-jue@northwestern.edu.

 

 

Winter 2014

 

*Text too small? Read the full descriptions below.

 

Asian Am 380-0

TOPICS IN ASIAN AMERICAN ARTS AND PERFORMANCE:

ASIAN AMERICAN SOCIAL DOCUMENTARIES

Leo Chiang
This hybrid film studies & video production course is a special seminar introducing students to the theory and practice of social documentaries through critical viewings of non-fiction films on Asian American subject matters and production of short documentaries on persons and issues relevant to Asian Americans or other underrepresented communities of color in the Greater Chicago Area. 

Asian Am 216-0-20 / History 216

GLOBAL ASIANS

Ji-Yeon Yuh
This is a comparative course that will examine the international migration histories of different Asian groups in the 20th century and the development of community and identity of those groups in different national contexts. We will interrogate the concept of diaspora versus migration versus immigration, and the different notions of identity implicit in each framework (diasporic community, sojourner, etc.). We will examine the immigration policies of host countries in Europe, the Americas, and Asia, and the settlement histories of Asians within these countries. We will discuss notions of group belonging and ideas of citizenship, nationality and ethnicity, and also compare how different ethnic groups and different national societies have handled ethnic/racial/cultural diversity. We will, in short, be examining the crossing and construction of multiple borders, the cultural encounters and the mixings, of various Asian groups in various socioeconomic and political contexts in different nation-states.
*Historical Studies Distro

Asian Am 218-0-20 / AFAM 218-0

ASIAN AND BLACK HISTORICAL RELATIONS

Nitasha Sharma
This course examines Black and Asian race relations in the U.S.  Topics range from the racialization and sexualization of Blacks and Asians to international “Afro-Asian” connections. We then focus on WWII and the post-war economy and the resulting racial and economic dynamics for Blacks and Asians.  We then examine the rise of racial consciousness in the sixties, moving beyond Black and White to reconceptualize inter-minority relations.  Following a section on the Third World internationalism of Black and Asian leaders (e.g., W.E.B. du Bois and Mao Tse-tung) and overlapping Black and Asian movements, we analyze stereotypes used to pit Asians and Blacks against one another.  We conclude the quarter with a section on Islam, race and rap and discuss the futures of Asian and Black relations in the U.S.
*Historical Studies Distro
*Social and Behavioral Sciences Distro

 

Asian Am 275-0-20 / English 275-0-21

INTRO TO ASIAN AMERICAN LITERATURE

Jinah Kim
This course examines literature, film, and critical theory created by Asian Americans in order to examine the development of “Asian America” as a literary field.  We will explore Asian American literature and theory in relation to questions of race, nation and empire. We will learn to ‘deconstruct’ the text and understand how Asian American literature and culture offers a parallax view into American history, culture and political-economy. Starting from the premise that Asian America operate as a contested category of ethnic and national identity we will consider how Asian American literatures and cultures “defamiliarize” American exceptionalist claims to pluralism, modernity, and progress. The novels, short stories, plays and films we will study in this class chart an ongoing movement in Asian American studies from negotiating the demands for domesticated narratives of immigrant assimilation to crafting new modes of critique highlighting Asian America’s transnational and postcolonial history and poesis.

*Literature and Fine Arts Distro

Asian Am 380-0-20 / Theatre 365-2-20

ASIAN-BLACK CONNECTIONS IN THE U.S.

THEATRE & PERFORMANCE

Elizabeth Son
This course examines performances by and about Asian American and African American subjects in order to understand an intertwined history of race and racism in the United States.  We will consider how the development and contestation of racialized meanings through varied performances impact experiences of place, identity, community and belonging.  The course begins in the nineteenth century with a comparative study of embodied negotiations of racism and racial desires in museum and fair displays of Asian and black bodies. The course then examines the influence of ideas of Asia and Asian bodies on African American performances and African American influences on Asian American sites of performance. We then turn to cross-racial alliances in hip hop and activism. The course concludes by exploring contemporary theatrical representations of Asian/Black relationships in such works as Twilight, Los Angeles, 1992 and Satellites.  In addition to dramatic texts, we will read key works in Asian American and African American history and cultural studies, along with readings in critical race theory, feminist theory and performance theory.

 

Fall 2013

 

                  

 

Asian Am 106-6-20

Freshmen Seminar: Noir: Race & Detective Texts

Jinah Kim
We will explore one of the most enduring and flexible genres in American popular culture – film and literary noir. Film noir, or “black film,” and its literary corollary, the hard boiled crime fiction, is distinguished by a style and theme that focuses on blackened frames and darkened lives. The genre plays with tropes of light and dark in order to demonstrate how people become “black” because of their immoral behavior. In this course we will consider how racial difference plays a constitutive role in the American imaginary and suffuses one of the most popular genres in American culture. And in doing so, we will also explore some of the most enduring themes in American culture: lust, sin, crime, greed and regret in the multiracial city.

Asian Am 247-0-20

Asian Americans & Pop Culture

Jinah Kim

Asian Americans are active producers of popular culture. We will study films, novels, short stories, and hip hop that transgress racial, gender and social norms. First, we will consider how these Asian American texts represent rebellious figures such as queer boys and girls. We will consider how authors draw on these figures to contest the “model minority” stereotype, American racism, homophobia, conflicts between generations and more. Secondly, we will consider how some of these works have the potential to unsettle the idea that there are “correct” and “incorrect” ways of seeing, reading, writing and knowing. Finally, we will consider the differences and similarities between individual acts of rebellion and collective acts of resistance in these texts, to tap the well of Asian American collective imaginations to dream of a more just future.

*Literature and Fine Arts Distro Area

Asian Am 392-0-20 / American St 310-1

The Global Cold War

Simeon Man

The course provides a critical examination of post-1965 Asian American communities in light of the demographic, social, racial and economic trends in both the United States and Asia today. In particular, the course will focus on key themes such as the model minority, immigration, mental health, family, education, and religion. An important objective of this course is raising students’ awareness of and responsibility to the needs of Asian American communities.

History 392-22

Comparative Race and Ethnicity

Shana Bernstein

This course explores the comparative history of various racial and ethnic groups in the twentieth-century United States. While tensions between and relations among African Americans and whites have shaped U.S. history in important ways, this course also recognizes the historical significance of multiple racial and ethnic groups, particularly Asian Americans and Latinos. We will consider the histories of the various groups alongside one another and U.S. History more generally, as well as intersections among the various groups. Readings include both primary and secondary sources.

*although not co-listed with Asian Am, counts toward Asian American Studies minor

 

2012-2013

 

Spring 2013                   

 

Asian Am 203-0-20/American Studies 310-0-22

Topics in Social & Cultural Analysis: Asian American Activism

Simeon Man
The Asian American movement of the late 1960s occupies a pivotal place in the history of Asian American cultural politics. Yet this movement did not occur in a vacuum. In this class, we will situate this movement within a longer history of Asian American activism, from the late nineteenth century to the present. From the labor organizing of early migrant workers to the multifaceted struggles of the contemporary moment, Asian Americans have contested their social, political, and economic marginalization by utilizing the courts, demonstrating in public spaces, and engaging a range of cultural practices. How have political affinities forged with African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans in the United States—and with Asian peoples abroad—empowered Asian Americans in their struggles for justice? How have these cross-racial and transnational movements reinforced or challenged conceptions of justice rooted in U.S. American liberal ideals? We will examine topics such as immigration reform, antiwar and anticolonial movements, draft resistance, Japanese American redress, hate crimes, racial profiling, and affirmative action.

*Social & Behavioral Sciences Distro Area

Asian Am 304-0-20/History 304

Asian American Women’s History

Ji-Yeon Yuh

This course explores the intersections of gender, race, and ethnicity in the historical experiences of Asian American women. We will consider a variety of themes significant to those experiences, including immigration and citizenship, exclusion and discrimination, family and community structures, paid and unpaid labor, and resistance and activism. We will discuss how these historical experiences shaped the development of Asian American female subjectivities and feminisms..

*Historical Studies Distro Area

Asian Am 225-0-20/Sociology 276-0-22

Contemporary Issues in Asian American Communities

Carolyn Chen

The course provides a critical examination of post-1965 Asian American communities in light of the demographic, social, racial and economic trends in both the United States and Asia today. In particular, the course will focus on key themes such as the model minority, immigration, mental health, family, education, and religion. An important objective of this course is raising students’ awareness of and responsibility to the needs of Asian American communities.

*Social & Behavioral Sciences Distro and Historical Studies Distro Area

Asian Am 203-0-21/History 200-0-40

Topics in Social & Cultural Analysis: The Chinese American Experience

Beth Lew-Williams

There is no singular “Chinese Americans experience.” This lecture/discussion course strives to introduce students to the multiple, varied, but overlapping experiences of people of Chinese heritage in the United States. Chinese have usually been relegated to the margins of American history, but this course will put them at the center in order to reveal how major events in American history affected the lives of Chinese Americans and how Chinese Americans played important roles in shaping those events. We will address the process of migration and settlement that brought Chinese to America and the economic, political, religious, and colonial contexts of this movement. We will also consider the racialization of Chinese in America; in other words, how other Americans came to view the Chinese race and how Chinese themselves understood their racial status in America. We will examine canonical Chinese American moments and places (like the California Gold Rush, San Francisco Chinatown, the Transcontinental Railroad) but also look for Chinese where they are unexpected (like colonial America, the 1950s South, the Civil Rights Movement). Students will engage a wide variety of primary sources, including memoirs, fiction, political cartoons, government documents, oral histories, and films.

Asian Am 392-0-20

Korean Americans and the Korean War

Ji-Yeon Yuh

The Korean War is iconic in both Korean and Korean American history. This course examines the social and cultural legacies of the Korean War for Korean Americans. We start with the war itself and move on to discuss the three major types of migration the war initiated, military brides, adoptees and refuge migrants. Then we discuss how the war is remembered and mis-remembered, and portrayed in films and literature, and what that has meant for Korean American identity.

Asian Am 394-0-20

Professional Linkage: Asian American Arts in Practice

Tatsu Aoki

Arts in Practice is a survey and research based class structure. This course will examine the cross-cultural work of Asian American artists with a focus on the Chicago area along with the influence of national movement. The main focus of the study will be the phenomenal development in the last 10 years as the Chicago area (but not limited to) marks significant contribution for the new music and performing arts. Also, many of influential cyber arts and/or non-arts movement such as Youtube submissions, Internet-based performing activities and web page presentations will be investigated. Themes that will be addressed are the forming of new cultural and artistic communities and their impact on the mainstream culture, collaboration between communities and cultures on local and transnational levels, culture, community and economic development issues in the arts and society.

Winter 2013                        

 

Asian 203-0-20/Anthro 390-0-22

Topics: Asian Persuasion: Asian American Advertising and Consumption

Shalini Shankar

What is Asian American advertising, and how can we understand cultural production and consumption practices among Asian Americans? This course will examine ethnographic approaches to such questions for Asian communities in the United States. We will examine the production of advertising for specific Asian ethnic groups. We will also look at other cultural productions, such as fashion, where advertising plays a key role. Second, we will look at studies documenting Asian Americans’ roles in popular culture and commodities. Finally, the course will compare advertising and consumption in the US with China, India, Japan, and other Asian nation-states.

*Social & Behavioral Sciences Distro Area

Asian Am 214-0-20/History 214-0-20

Introduction to Asian American History

Ji-Yeon Yuh

This course is an introduction to the history of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans in the United States. We will examine the experiences of these two groups from a historically-grounded, interdisciplinary perspective within the international context of diaspora and labor migration and the domestic context of race relations, nation-building and U.S. prominence as a world power. Reaching back to the earliest encounters of Asians with the Americas, we will discuss how European imperialism and American expansionism shaped those encounters into a history that has parallels to the forced migration of Africans as slaves. We will also examine the ways in which images such as the Yellow Peril and the Model Minority have concrete impact on Asians in the U.S., and explore their significance in American discourse on race.

*Historical Studies Distro Area

Asian Am 218-0-20/African Am 218-0-20

Asian-Black Historical Relations in the U.S.

Nitasha Sharma

This course offers an examination of Black and Asian race relations in the U.S. Topics range from the racialization and sexualization of Blacks and Asians to international “Afro-Asian” connections. We then focus on WWII and the post-war economy and the resulting racial and economic dynamics for Blacks and Asians. We then examine the rise of racial consciousness in the sixties, moving beyond Black and White to reconceptualize inter-minority relations. Following a section on the Third World internationalism of Black and Asian leaders (e.g., W.E.B. du Bois and Mao Tse-tung) and overlapping Black and Asian movements, we analyze stereotypes used to pit Asians and Blacks against one another. We conclude the quarter with a section on Islam, race and rap and discuss the futures of Asian and Black relations in the U.S.

*Social & Behavioral Sciences Distro and Historical Studies Distro Area

Asian Am 392-0-20/American 310-0-22

Seminar: The American Century in Asia

Jinah Kim

“The American Century” is a term popularized by Life editor Henry Luce and describes what he imagined as the utopic potential of an American global leadership made necessary by the decline of European empires across the world after WWII. In this interdisciplinary class we will study the history and representations of the U.S. in Asia to map the tight connections wrought between these two spaces in constituting the American Century. We will also develop “intimacy” as an analytic to understand how wartime relations and post-war development projects rearrange domestic and gender practices as well as national culture, politics and economy. Topics will range from war brides to transnational adoption to the role of Christian missions.

Asian Am 394-0-20

Professional Linkage: Asian Identity in Cinema

Tatsu Aoki

This course will examine the cross-cultural work of Asian American artists with a focus on the Chicago area along with the influence of national movements. The main focus of the study will be the phenomenal development in the last 10 years as the Chicago area marks significant contribution to new music and performing arts. Themes that will be addressed are the forming of new cultural and artistic communities and their impact on the mainstream culture, collaboration between communities and cultures on local and transnational levels, culture, and the art society’s community and economic development issues.

 

Fall 2012

           

Asian Am 106-6-20 (Freshman Seminar)

Shades of Noir: Race and Detective Texts

Jinah Kim

We will explore one of the most enduring and flexible genres in American popular culture – film and literary noir.  Film noir, or “black film,” and its literary corollary, the hard boiled crime fiction, is distinguished by a style and theme that focuses on blackened frames and darkened lives. The genre plays with tropes of light and dark in order to demonstrate how people become “black” because of their immoral behavior.  And yet the specifically racial overtones of noir has not been explored by critics.  In this course we will consider how racial difference plays a constitutive role in the American imaginary and suffuses one of the most popular genres in American culture.  And in doing so, we will also explore some of the most enduring themes in American culture: lust, sin, crime, greed and regret in the multiracial city.

Asian Am 203-0-21

The South Asian American Experience

Nitasha Sharma

This course provides a historical, thematic, and contemporary analysis of the lives of South Asians in America, or desis.  South Asian Americans include people from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, and Burma and their U.S.-born children.  What are the experiences of desis, and what have been their primary concerns?  We will first review the immigration histories of South Asians to the U.S., analyzing how desis’ lives, including their immigration, settlement patterns, marriage, occupations, and racial status, have been impacted by U.S. law.  Turning to contemporary experiences, we focus on the rise of second and third generation desi youth.  In this section, we cover topics including: negotiating family expectations of gender, sexual, marital, economic, and career goals; desi musical subcultures of bhangra and hip hop; inter-racial relations; and their political worldviews and activism.  Throughout, we will evaluate popular depictions and scholarly theories of South Asians through the lenses of assimilation and cultural retention and characterizations of desis as model minorities, hybrid beings, and as American, ethnic, and racial beings.  Are these accurate depictions?  We conclude by considering the impact of 9/11 and the future concerns of South Asians in the U.S.

*Social & Behavioral Sciences Distro Area

 

Asian Am 275-0-20/English 275-0-21

Introduction to Asian American Literature

Jinah Kim

This course examines literature, film, and critical theory created by Asian Americans in order to examine the development of “Asian America” as a literary field.  We will explore how Asian American literature and theory engages themes and questions in literary studies, particularly related to questions of race, nation and empire, such as sentimentalism, the autobiography, buildungsroman and genre studies.  For example, how does Carlos Bulosan draw on tropes and images of 1930’s American depression to draw equivalence between Filipino colonial subjects and domestic migrant workers?  How does Siu Sin Far use sentimentalism as a strategy to evoke empathy for her mixed race protagonists? How does Hirahara manipulate conventions of literary noir to contest dominant recollections of WWII?  Thus we are also learning to ‘deconstruct’ the text and understand how Asian American literature and culture offers a parallax view into American history, culture and political-economy. Starting from the premise that Asian America operate as a contested category of ethnic and national identity we will consider how Asian American literatures and cultures “defamiliarize” American exceptionalist claims to pluralism, modernity, and progress. The novels, short stories, plays and films we will study in this class chart an ongoing movement in Asian American studies from negotiating the demands for domesticated narratives of immigrant assimilation to crafting new modes of critique highlighting Asian America’s transnational and postcolonial history and poesis.

*Literature & Fine Arts Sciences Distro Area

 

Asian Am 335-0-20/Anthropology 335-0-20

Language in Asian America

Shalini Shankar

This course will examine ethnographic approaches to language use among Asian communities in the United States. Focusing on both “heritage languages” (mother tongues) as well as varieties of English, we will explore topics of language socialization, bilingualism, code-switching, language retention and loss, style, stereotypes, the social dynamics of English as a Second Language, and slang. Connections between these topics and broader dynamics of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality will be made. Special attention will be paid to processes of racial and ethnic formation through language ideologies and use, especially in the context of English monolingualism, the model minority stereotype, and the white public sphere.

*Social & Behavioral Sciences Distro Area

 

Asian Am 392-0-20/American 310-0-22

Studies in American Culture: Race Wars in American Culture

Simeon Man

This seminar takes up “race war” as an analytical concept for thinking about the question of empire in U.S. culture.   From the conquest of native peoples across the American continent to the Spanish American War, from World War II to the U.S. War in Vietnam, from the Cold War to the “war on terror”—wars have been waged not only in the name of territorial acquisition and diplomacy, but have also profoundly shaped ideas about race and nation in U.S. society.  We therefore approach the study of race beyond U.S. borders, using interdisciplinary methods to interrogate its formation in transnational and imperial contexts.  How have racial ideologies worked to rationalize U.S. conquest, “pacification,” and occupation overseas?  In turn, how have these processes reinforced and reified racial concepts, representations, and practices in the United States?  In examining these questions, we will pay attention to how historically marginalized subjects have responded to wars, from proclaiming their loyalty and patriotism to engaging in more critical acts of protests, within and beyond the United States.

 

Asian Am 370-0-20/Gender Studies 341-0-20

Diaspora in Asian American Studies: Transnational Sexualities

Jillana Enteen

Current scholarly work on globalization, particularly in the area of same-sex desire in non-western locations, is struggling to understand local appropriations of seemingly western signs—like gay and lesbian rights and identity politics—in the context of increasingly expanding transnational communication, late-capitalist flow of commodities and people, and economic development. Some have argued that sexuality is now globalized, construing categories like gay and lesbian as universals that travel across space and time. In these approaches, what is seen to be happening is the importation of western cultural practices to non-western places, where local cultures, seen as traditional, authentic, and in many cases, pre-modern, are recipients of the spread of western cultures. The West is thereby equated with the global, and local gay and lesbian scenes and practices are interpreted as copies of “real” non-heterosexual identities.

In this course, we will analyze the term globalization and the idea of a “global gay” culture. We will then consider some critiques of queer theory, examining its lack of a wider social and economic perspective and of the material and social components of sexualities, its relationship to a Euro-American rights-based discourse of sexual difference, and a post- modernist approach to sexuality. Ethnographic investigations and popular productions of same-sex cultures outside the West will also be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on the studies and representations of non-heterosexuality in Thailand.

*Social & Behavioral Sciences Distro Area

Asian Am 380-0-20/Theatre 307-0-20

Topics in Asian Am Arts/Perf; Course Title: War, Gender and Memory in Asian American Performance

Elizabeth W. Son

This course examines the history of U.S. involvement in wars in Asia and the Pacific alongside Asian American cultural productions, which emerged in response to colonization, militarization, internment, migration and displacement.  Our objective is to understand how theatre, performance art, spoken word and social performances (for example, pilgrimages by adoptees and family history projects) in particular are significant sites and critical practices in contesting these histories of imperialism. We will have a particular focus on the relation of gender and memory, particularly how women employ memory to make political claims and to articulate histories of violence that have long been silenced.  Our investigations will be guided by these inquiries: How do migrants and displaced people construct, inhabit and reproduce memories of war through cultural productions?  How have embodied Asian American cultural expressions served as a site to counter the familial, cultural and historical amnesia that surround traumas of war?   We will read key works in Asian American history and cultural studies, along with critical readings from (post)colonial, trauma, feminist and performance studies.  Previous knowledge of Asian American performance is not necessary.

 

Course Offerings 2011 - 2012

Note: All classes are subject to change. Please confirm classes by checking with the Registrar's Bulletin each quarter.

FALL 2011

ASIAN AM 106-6, Freshman Seminar: "Shades of Noir - Race and Detective Texts," Jinah Kim

ASIAN AM 203-0, (also Anthro 390), Introduction to Asian American Social & Cultural Analysis: "Language in Asian America," Shalini Shankar

ASIAN AM 210-0, Introduction to Asian American Studies, Nitasha Sharma

ASIAN AM 216-0, Introduction to Asian Diasporas (New Course; also History 216), Ji-Yeon Yuh

ASIAN AM  247-0, Introduction to Asian American Popular Culture: "Rebels in Asian America," Jinah Kim

WINTER 2012

ASIAN AM 214-0, (also History 214), Introduction to Asian American History, Ji-Yeon Yuh

  

ASIAN AM/ANTRHO 365-0, Language, Race, and Ethnicity in the U.S., Shalini Shankar

  

ASIAN AM 370-0, Diaspora in Asian American Studies: Race, Globalization & Diaspora, Ji-Yeon Yuh

  

ASIAN AM 394-0, Professional Linkage Program Asian Identity in Cinema, Tatsu Aoki

  

ENG 101-6: Native Speakers, Native Speakers: Contemporary Asian American Literature, Susannah Gottleib

 

SPRING 2012

ASIAN AM 203/SOCIO 276-0-21, "The Second Generation Asian American Experience," Carolyn Chen

*Social and Behavorial Sciences Distro Area

Asian AM 218/African AM Studies 218, "Cracking the Color Lines: Asian/Black Relations in the U.S.," Nitasha Sharma

*Historical Studies/Social & Behavorial Sciences Distro Area

ASIAN AM 250, HAPA Issues: Asian Americans of Mixed Racial Descent, Nitasha Sharma

*Social and Behavorial Sciences Distro Area

ASIAN AM 275, "Introduction to Asian American Literature, Jinah Kim

*Literature and Fine Arts Distro

 

ASIAN AM 394-0, "Asian American Arts in Practice," Tatsu Aoki

 

2009-2010 Course Offerings

Spring 2010

Asian Am 225-0-20: Contemporary Issues in Asian American Communities
Carolyn Chen

Asian Am 350-0-20: Asian American Religions
Carolyn Chen

Asian Am 360-0-20: Asian American Women and Gender
Phuong Nguyen

Asian Am 380-0-20: Asian American Arts and Performance: "South Asian American Women's Writing"
Pavithra Prasad

Asian Am 394-0-20: Professional Linkage: Asian American Arts in Practice
Tatsu Aoki

Asian Am 394-0-21 Professional Linkage: Asian American Racial Justice Policy and Practice
Diana Lin

 

Winter 2010

Asian Am 201-0-20: Contemporary Asian Immigration to the U.S.
Carolyn Chen

Asian Am 275-0-20: Intro to Asian American Literature
(Combined course with English 275)
Jinah Kim

Asian Am 304-0-20: Asian American Women's History
(Combined course with History 304)
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Asian Am 365-0-20: Language, Race & Ethnicity
(Combined course with Anthropology 365)
Shalini Shankar

Asian Am 392-0-21: Youth Culture and Language
(Combined course with Anthro 390-0-23)
Shalini Shankar

Asian Am 392-0-22: Comparative Refugee Migrations & Refugee Nationalism
Phuong Nguyen

Asian Am 394-0-20: Professional Linkage: Asians in Cinema
Tatsu Aoki

Asian Am 394-0-21: Professional Linkage: Asian American Civil Rights
Diana Lin

 

Fall 2009

Asian Am 214-0-20: Asian American History
(Combined course with History 214)
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Asian Am 247-0-20: Asian Americans & Popular Culture (Rebels in Asian American Culture)
Jinah Kim

Asian Am 392-0-20: The American Century in Asia: Race, Gender & War
Jinah Kim

Asian Am 392-0-21: Asian American Literature and Literary Form
(Combined course with CLS 301)
Susannah Gottlieb

2008-2009 Course Offerings

*All classes are subject to change – Please confirm classes by checking with the Registrar’s Bulletin each quarter.

Spring 2009

Asian Am 360-0-20: Asian American Women and Gender
Shuji Otsuka

Asian Am 392-0-21: Multi-Ethnic Chicago
Shanshan Lan

Asian Am 394-0-20: Asian American Arts in Practice
Tatsu Aoki

Asian Am 394-0-21: Asian American Civil Rights - (NEW COURSE!)
Diana M. Lin

Winter 2009

Asian Am 201-0-20:  Intro to Asian American Cultures
Shanshan Lan

Asian Am 214-0-20: Asian American History
(Combined course with History 214)
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Asian Am 218-0-20: Cracking the Color Lines: Asian/Black Relations in the U.S.
(This is the same course as AFAM 218)
Nitasha Sharma

Asian Am 380-0-20: Topics in Asian American Performance: Asian American Theater
Jisoo Chung

Asian Am 392-0-20: Seminar in Asian American Studies: Language, Race and Ethnicity in America
Shalini Shankar

Asian Am 392-0-21: Seminar in Asian American Studies: East Asian Diaspora in the U.S.
Shuji Otsuka

Asian Am 392-0-22: Seminar in Asian American Studies – The Radical 70s
Jinah Kim

Asian Am 394-0-20: Professional Linkage Program: Asian Identity in Cinema
Tatsu Aoki

Fall 2008

Asian American Studies 103-6-20: Freshman Seminar: Pop Culture of Asian American Youth
Nitasha Sharma

Asian Am 210-0:  Introduction to Asian American Studies
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Asian Am 275-0: Introduction to Asian American Literature
Jinah Kim

Asian Am 304-0: Asian American Women’s History
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Asian Am 370-0: Bollywood and Beyond
Shalini Shankar

Asian Am 392-0: Seminar in Asian Am Studies: Asian Americans, Mexican Americans, and African Americans: Comparative Racial Formations in U.S. History
Shuji Otsuka

2007-2008 Course Offerings

*All classes are subject to change – Please confirm classes by checking with the Registrar’s Bulletin each quarter.

Spring 2008

Asian American Studies 201-0-21: Topics in Asian American Studies : Race, Ethnicity & Islam in N. America
Yuting Wang

Asian American Studies 201-0-22: Topics in Asian American Studies: Contemporary Asian Immigration to the U.S.
Carolyn Chen

Asian American Studies 392-0-20: Seminar in Asian American Studies: Asian Americans & the Internet
John Cheng

Asian American Studies 392-0-21: Seminar in Asian American Studies: Multi-Ethnic Chicago
Shanshan Lan

Asian American Studies 392-0-22: Seminar in Asian American Studies: Asian Am & Black Relations #2
Nitasha Sharma

Asian American Studies 394-0-20: Professional Linkage Program: Asian American Arts in Practice
Tatsu Aoki

Winter 2008

Asian American Studies 201-0-20: Topics in Asian American Studies:
The American Century in Asia

Jinah Kim

Asian American Studies 201-0-21: Topics in Asian American Studies:
HAPA Issues: Asian Americans of Mixed Descent

Nitasha Sharma

Asian American Studies 201-0-20: Topics in Asian American Studies:
Cracking the Colorlines: Asian/Black Relations in the U.S.

(This course is also co-listed as African American Studies 214)
Nitasha Sharma

Asian American Studies 214: Asian American History
John Cheng

Asian American Studies 370: Bollywood and Beyond
Shalini Shankar

Asian American Studies 392: Seminar in Asian American Studies:
Imagining Chinatown: Race, Community Building and the Construction of Differences

Shanshan Lan

Asian American Studies 392: Seminar in Asian American Studies:
Civil Rights as Human Rights: Lessons from the Japanese American Internment during World War II

Stephen Mak

Asian American Studies 394: Professional Linkage Series:
Asian Identity in Cinema

Tatsu Aoki

Humanities 301-0: Topics in Humanities: Globalization, Race, and Diaspora
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Fall 2007

Asian American Studies 106-6: Freshman Seminar: Asian American Lives, Past & Present
John Cheng

Asian American Studies 201-20: Imagine Los Angeles: Asian American Literature
Jinah Kim

Asian American Studies 201: Anglo-Asian Literature
Heidi Kim

Asian American Studies 201: Politics of Race & Immigration
Stephen Mak

Asian American Studies 392-0: Seminar in Asian American Studies: Comparative Racial Formations
Shuji Otsuka

2006-2007 Course Offerings

Spring 2007

Asian American Studies 201-0-20: Asian Americans & Hollywood
Jinah Kim

Asian American Studies 201-0-21: Gender & Masculinity
John Cheng

Asian American Studies 201-0-22: HAPA Issues — Asian Americans of Mixed Descent
Nitasha Tamar Sharma

Asian American Studies 392-0-20: Asian American & Black Relations in the U.S.
Nitasha Tamar Sharma

Asian American Studies 394-0-20: LGBT Law & Policy in Asian America
Myron Dean Quon

Winter 2007

Asian American Studies 201-0-20: South Asians in Context
Neeraja Kasini

Asian American Studies 201-0-21: Asian American Religions
Carolyn Chen

Asian American Studies 214-0-20: Asian American History
John Cheng

Asian American Studies 392-0-20: Asian American Families
Carolyn Chen

Asian American Studies 392-0-21: Imagining Los Angeles: Asian American Literature and the Cultural Politics of the Global City
Jinah Kim

Asian American Studies 394: Asian Identity in Cinema
Tatsu Aoki

Fall 2006

Asian American Studies 106: Asian American Lives, Past & Present
John Cheng

Asian American Studies 236: Introduction to Asian American Politics
David Tully

Asian American Studies 275: Introduction to Asian American Literature
Heidi Kim

2005-2006 Course Offerings

Spring 2006

Asian American Studies 201-0-20: Illegitimate Media
Abigail Derecho

Asian American Studies 201-0-21: Taiwanese Americans
John Cheng

Asian American Studies 380-0-20: Asian American Performance
Jyoti Argade

Asian American Studies 392-0-21: Techno-Orientalism
Abigail Derecho

Asian American Studies 394-0-20: LGBT Policy in Asian America
Myron Quon, Esquire

Winter 2006

Asian American Studies 201-0-20: South Asians in Context
Neeraja Aravamudan

Asian American Studies 201-0-21: Gender & Masculinity
John Cheng

Asian American Studies 275: Introduction to Asian American Literature
Dorothy Wang

Asian American Studies 370: Diaspora in Asian American Studies
Ji-Yeon Yuh

English 378: Asian American Writing & the Visual Arts
Dorothy Wang

Asian American Studies 380: Indian Classical Dance in Contemporary Context
Jyoti Argade

Asian American 392: Comparative Racial Formations
Shuji Otsuka

Asian American Studies 394: Asian American Arts in Practice
Tatsu Aoki

Fall 2005

Asian American Studies 106: Asian American Dreams
John Cheng

Asian American Studies 214: Asian American History
Ji-Yeon Yuh

English 378: Asian American Experimental Poetry
Dorothy Wang

History 392: Korean Diaspora
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Asian American 392: Comparative Racial Formations
Shuji Otsuka

Asian American Studies 394: Asian Identity in Cinema
Tatsu Aoki

2004-2005 Course Offerings

Spring 2005

Asian American Studies 201: Contemporary Asian Immigration to the US
Carolyn Chen

Asian American Studies 201: Asian Americans and Contemporary Social/Public Policy
John Cheng

English 275: Introduction to Asian American Literature
Dorothy Wang

Asian American Studies 392: Language, Power, and Immigrant Students
Eva Lam

Asian American Studies 392: The Final Frontier?: Science Fiction and the Politics of Race
John Cheng

Winter 2005

Asian American Studies 201: Contemporary Issues in Asian American Communities
Carolyn Chen

Asian American Studies 201: Asian Americans and Popular Culture
John Cheng

Asian American Studies 201: Asian American Politics
Catherine Paden

Asian American Studies 392: Placing Race in Cyberspace: Asian Americans and the Internet
John Cheng

Asian American Studies 394: Asian American Arts Practice
Tatsu Aoki

Fall 2004

Asian American 392: Asian Americans, Mexican Americans, and African Americans: Comparative Racial Formations in U.S. History
Shuji Otsuka

Asian American 392: East Asian Diaspora: Korean, Chinese, and Japanese in the U.S.
Shuji Otsuka

English 365: Postcolonial Currents in Asian Diaspora Fiction
Jillana Enteen

History 102: Asian American Memoirs (Freshmen Seminar)
Ji-Yeon Yuh

History 214: Asian American History
Ji-Yeon Yuh

2003-2004 Course Offerings

Spring 2004

Asian Am 201: Asian American Religions
Carolyn Chen

Asian Am 392: E Asian Diaspora: Korean, Chinese, Japanese in the US
Shuji Otsuka

English 375: The Medium is the Message: Asian American Literature and Literary Form
Susannah Gottlieb

Asian & Middle East Studies Elective (Pick One)

Race & Ethnicity Elective (Pick One)

Other courses may be eligible with advisor's consent. The purpose of this requirement is to provide students with conceptual and comparative breadth concerning a topic central to Asian American Studies. A range of courses will be selected from the Department of African American Studies, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Gender Studies. You must approve your course choice with the advisor.

Winter 2004

Asian Am 201: Contemporary Issues in Asian American Communities
Carolyn Chen

Asian Am 392: Japanese Americans and the Pacific Wars
Shuji Otsuka

English 375: Asian American Experimental Writing
Dorothy Wang

History 214: Asian American History
Ji-Yeon Yuh

History 392: Korean Diaspora
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Asian & Middle East Studies Elective (Pick One)

Race & Ethnicity Elective (Pick One)

Fall 2003

English 275: Introduction to Asian American Literature
Dorothy Wang

History 102-6-24: Telling Stories, Speaking Truths: Asian American Lives
Ji-Yeon Yuh

History 391: Asian American Women
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Asian & Middle East Studies Elective (Pick One)

Race & Ethnicity Elective (Pick One)

Other courses may be eligible with advisor's consent. The purpose of this requirement is to provide students with conceptual and comparative breadth concerning a topic central to Asian American Studies. A range of courses will be selected from the Department of African American Studies, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Gender Studies. You must approve your course choice with the advisor.

2002-2003 Course Offerings

Spring 2003

Asian Am 392: Vietnamese in America
Nhi Lieu

Asian Am 392: Historical and Contemporary Gender Issues
Nhi Lieu

English 275: Introduction to Asian American Literature
Karen Su

Asian & Middle East Studies Elective (Pick one)

Race & Ethnicity Elective (Pick one)

Other courses may be eligible with advisor's consent. The purpose of this requirement is to provide students with conceptual and comparative breadth concerning a topic central to Asian American Studies. A range of courses will be selected from the Department of African American Studies, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Gender Studies. You must approve your course choice with the advisor.

Winter 2003

History 214: Asian American History
Nhi Lieu

Asian Am 392: Asian Americans and Popular Culture
Nhi Lieu

Asian Am 392: Japanese Americans and the Pacific Wars
Shuji Otsuka

Asian Am 394: Asian American Cinema in Practice
Ben Kim

Theatre 140-2-20: Asian American Drama
Emily Estelle Colborn

Asian and Middle East Studies (Pick One)

Race & Ethnicity elective (Pick One)

Other courses may be eligible with advisor's consent. The purpose of this requirement is to provide students with conceptual and comparative breadth concerning a topic central to Asian American Studies. A range of courses will be selected from the Department of African American Studies, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Gender Studies. You must approve your course choice with the advisor.

Fall 2002

Asian Am 394: American Cinema in Practice
Ben Kim

Race & Ethnicity Electives
Select 1 course in any discipline focusing on "race and ethnicity" outside of Asian American studies.

The purpose of this requirement is to provide students with conceptual and comparative breadth concerning a topic central to Asian American Studies. A range of courses will be selected from the Department of African American Studies, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Gender Studies. You must approve your course choice with the advisor.

2001-2002 Course Offerings

Spring 2002

English 275: Contemporary Asian American Fiction
Thomas Kim

English 375: America
Thomas Kim

Asian Am 380: American Performance
Priya Srinivasan

History 391: Asian American Women
Ji-Yeon Yuh

History 492-0-22: Theorizing Diaspora History
(Graduate level)
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Race and Ethnicity Electives (other courses not listed may be counted towards minor with approval of AAS advisor)

Winter 2002

English 375-0-20: The Medium Is the Message: Asian American Literature and Literary Form
Susannah Gottlieb

Gender Studies 390-0-23: Recent Asian Fiction In Diaspora: Representing Race and Sexualities
Jillana Enteen

Political Science 390-24: Asian American Politics
Brandon Rottinghaus

History 214-0: Asian American History
Ji-Yeon Yuh

History 395-22: American Democracy and the Internment of Japanese Americans
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Asian Am 394: Asian American Cinema in Practice
Ben Kim

English 471: Critical Debate in Asian American Literary Studies (graduate level)
Dorothy Wang

Race and Ethnicity Electives (other courses not listed may be counted towards minor with approval of AAS advisor)

Fall 2001

English 275: Introduction to Asian American Studies
Dorothy Wang

2000-2001 Course Offerings

Spring 2001

History 214-0-01: Asian American History
Ji-Yeon Yuh

History 392/395/Gender Studies 390-0-23: Topics in Gender Studies: Asian American Women's History
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Gender Studies 390-0-22: Topics in Gender Studies: Borderlines: Gender Concerns in Indian and Indian American Literature
Vrinda Nabar

English 378: Studies in American Literature: Asian American Literary and Cultural Theories
Dorothy Wang

Race and Ethnicity - pick one elective (other courses may be eligible with advisor's consent)
Af-Am 210-0 AfAm Lit-Contemporary
Af-Am 214-0: History of Racial Minorities
Af-Am 245-0: Communities in Diaspora
Af-Am 379-0: AfAm Women Playwrights
Af-Am 380-0: Topics: Great Black Women in Gospel

History 102-6: Native Americans in the Early Republic
Rzeczkowski

History 102-6-21: Race in the 20th Century
Gadsden

History 106-22: Race and Society in Depression and War
Wolfinger

History 349-0: History of the Holocaust
Hayes

History 392-27: Segregation in Urban America:1900 – Present
McCoyer

History 492-21: Readings in African-American History
Green

Poli Sci 360: Comparative Racial Politics
Hanchard

Poli Sci 395 Research Seminar: Racial Politics in American Cities Sec 21
Rogers

Performance Studies 309-2-20: Performance of Black Literature
McElroy

Performance Studies 307-2-20: Studies in Gender and Performance
Johnson

Sociology 201-0: Social Inequality, Race, Class and Power
Morris

Winter 2001

Asian Am 201-0: Asian American Literature
Dorothy Wang

Sociology 101-6: South Asians in the US
Neeraja Aravamudan

History 392-26: Indians in America
Padma Rangaswami

1999-2000

Spring 2000

History 391: Migration and Community in Asian Diaspora
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Winter 2000

History 392: Imagined Fantasies, Lived Realities: War Brides, Mail Order Brides and Sex Tourism
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Fall 1999

History 214: Asian American History
Ji-Yeon Yuh

Upcoming Event

Hidden Histories: Short films on Japanese American Incarceration During WWII
May 30, 20176:30 PM - 8:30 PM